Male Names
name description

A

A Bit Of A Lad:

indicates a male that likes to live life in the fast lane and who therefore corresponds to all the clichés about young men (or males). Drinks too much, womanises too much, pursues a generally hedonistic life style. If you think these are desirable qualities in a dog, by all means give your male dog this name. The term is slightly derogatory but not wholly condemnatory.

A Born Gentleman:

someone who has been brought up to be honourable, polite and honest from the day he was born. Ah yes, there are few of us left.......

A Feather In My Cap:

a distinctive achievement; an achievement that does credit to the person who did it.

A Gentleman Born:

a literary way of saying that the person concerned is a gentleman through and through, that he was born honourable.

A Hero Of Our Time;

a short novel by nineteenth-century Russian novelist, Mikhail Lermontov. The hero is a dashing but flawed Byronic adventurer and the descriptions of the Caucasus are breath-taking and evocative.

A Real Gentleman:

women are supposed to like these. Sometimes I wonder..... Anyway the expression exists and may be an ideal to aim for. Best not given to an unruly dog!

Aaron:

the older brother of Moses in the Old Testament. Biblical names from the OT are becoming more fashionable now and Aaron is one of them. There is a Welsh saint who lived most of his life in Brittany called St Aaron.

Abdas:

that rara avis, a Persian bishop and saint, martyred in the 5th century.

Abel:

an English-born bishop of Rheims (Reims) in France and who lived in the eighth century. Of course the best-known Abel is the first recorded murder victim (according to the spurious authority of the Bible), Adam and Eve's son, who was done in by his brother, Cain. The latter was the first human being to be born and Abel the first human being to be murdered. It makes most family relationships seem comparatively normal!

Able Seaman:

a sailor in the British Navy with at least two years' experience at sea. Cf, "ordinary seaman", same sort of thing but a complete novice with no practical experience at sea. However, there is some sort of pun going on here under the surface and the name might suit a dog destined for stud work. Nudge, nudge, wink, wink! Know what I mean, squire?

Abraham:

famous patriarch in the Bible. also the name of a number of Christian saints.

Acepsimas:

Catholic and Orthodox saint of Persia. Bishop of Hnaita in the west of Persia in the 4th century, he fell victim to the persecution of Christians by the Zoroastrian emperor, Shapur II, in 376.

Achilles:

a hero of Greek mythology and a priincipal character in the Trojan War. Famous for his slaying of Hector, Achilles was in his turn slain by Paris, who shot a fatal arrow into his heel, the only place on his body which was not invulnerable. The expression "Achilles' heel" (qv)refers to a person's weak spot, be it physical or, more usually, moral, psychological, etc.

Acyndin:

another Catholic and Orthodox saint of Persia who suffered under the persecutions of Emperor Shapur II in the fourth century.

Adagio:

from musical annotation,indicating that a piece of music should be played at a leisuely or even slow pace.

Adalbert:

the name of three Catholic saints: one was bishop of Prague in the 10th century; one was the first bishop of Magdeburg; and the last was an 8th century Northumbrian missionary. Apart from "Robert", boy's names ending in "-bert" do not appear to be particularly popular at the present time.

Adalric:

a 10th-century child saint, slain by the Normans in Bèze in the south of France while attempting to protect a church altar.

Adam Bede:

the title of a novel by George Eliot, who depsite the name was a nineteenth-century woman writer. First published in 1859, it deals with the rather awful subject of child murder. Perhaps for this reason, the novel was first published anonymously.

Adam:

according to Biblical mythology, the first man, created by God from dust or some such nonsense. Still a popular first name in English speaking countries and doubtless elsewhere.

Adami:

the surname of one of my best friends, who lives in Italy. Perhaps you could honour a really good friend by giving his/her name to a dog of your breeding. It might be advisable to ask the friend, just in case they might misunderstand and be offended. I asked a Greek friend of mine if I could use her first name as an official name for a puppy in my most recent litter and she was clearly insulted. Aren't some people odd?

Adamnan:

Irish saint who lived mostly in the seventh century. He is also the author of one of the most important bigraphies of the early Middle Ages (or Dark Ages as they are often called as well) about the life of St Columba.

Adelard:

French saint, cousin of Charlemagne, and grandson of Charles Martel who was King of the Franks. Lived in 8th and 9th centuries.

Adelelm:

or Adelelmus in Latin, a French saint of the 11th century who became the patron saint of Burgos in Spain. Also apparently the name of a Flemish saint too from the 12th century.

Adelph:

(Latin Adelphus) French saint and Benedictine monk. His grandfather was St Romaric. Adelph died in 670.

Adeodat:

saint and pope (Adeodatus I or II for reasons that are just too mystifying to go into in detail) of the 7th century and pope from 672 to 676.

Aderald:

French saint who died in 1004 (Latin Aderaldus).

Adherit:

Catholic saint. Died in the second century. Was born in Greece and became Bishop of Ravenna in Italy. (Adheritus in Latin).

Adjutor:

Catholic saint. A Norman aristocrat, he distinguished himself in the first Crusade, was captured by the Muslims but then escaped and returned to France where he lived the rest of his life as a recluse in an abbey. Ho-hum! Let's hope the minimum standards for sainthood these days are somewhat higher and more exemplary! Died in 1131.

Admiral:

a naval officer of very high rank. A word derived from Arabic. Also the name of two butterflies that can still be found in the UK, the red admiral and the white admiral. The word "admiral" here derives apparently from the word "admirable" as the butterflies themselves are quite attractive, not from an Arab word.

Adonis:

the Greek god of beauty and desire in Greek mythology. The word is frequently applied nowadays to any handsome young man.

Adorable Adrian:

just an endearing alliterative name no more, no less...

Adrian:

Adventurer:

Aedh:

Aeneas:

Aeolus:

Aeschylus:

Agamemnon:

mythological king of Mycenae (or Argos) who led the Greek troops in the Trojan War to recover the abducted wife, Helen ("the face that launched a thousand ships"), of his brother, Menelaus. According to the story, Agamemnon was murdered either by his wife, Clytemnestra (q.v.), or the latter's lover, when Agamemnon returned from the war.

Agapet:

Agatho:

Ageran:

Ageric:

Agilbert:

Agilulph:

Agofred:

Agricola:

Aibert:

Aichard:

Aigulph:

Aiken Drum:

the name of a Scottish nursery rhyme or song for children. "There was a man lived in the moon, lived in the moon, lived in the moon, There was a man lived in the moon and his name was Aiken Drum." is the first verse. Would suit a Scottish breed admirably.

Ajax:

Ajuture:

Aladdin Sane:

Aladdin's Cave:

Alaric:

Alas Poor Yorick:

the beginning of the famous cogitations on death by Hamlet in the homonymous Shakespearean play, where Hamlet contemplates the skull of the former court jester which has just been unearthed. Lugubrious ruminations indeed! Please note that "Yorick" has just one "r" in it. I have had a curly-coated retriever whose call name was Yorick and bred a curly puppy whose official pedigree name was "Yorick of Tonispada". I love the name.

Alban:

Alberic:

Albert Chain:

Albert:

Albertin:

Albin:

Alcmund:

Alcuin:

Aldate:

Aldebaran:

Aldebrand:

Aldemar:

Alderic:

Alderic:

Alderman:

Aldhelm:

Aldous:

Alexander:

Alexis:

Alfred:

Alfric:

Ali Baba:

the protagonist of a very famous tale from the "One Thousand And One Nights" sequence. Am I not right in thinking that the "One Thousand And One Nights" has never been fully translated into English and that those stories that have been were rather translated from a French translation rather than directly from Arabic? Can anyone elucidate this affair, sad and frankly unacceptable if true? If ever there were an argument in favour of teaching modern languages properly and with commitment in Britain, this could be adduced in support of improvements. I knew a student at Trinity College, Oxford, who was studying Arabic when I was studying French at Keble in the 1970s. I wonder whatever happened to him..... that was in an age where a knowledge of Arabic was considerably less important than it would be nowadays.

Allegro Con Brio:

an instruction from musical notation which is always given in eighteenth-century Italian. It means "in a lively, happy way" and might therefore be ideal for the optimistic owner of a lively dog (or vice versa). Note that this would apply only to a male: if you have a bitch she should be called "Allegra Con Brio" since Italian adjectives change according to the gender and number of the thing or person they describe.

Alpha:

Alphege:

Alphonse:

Alter Ego:

Latin for "other self", someone with another or maybe even split personality or who changes character easily. Strictly speaking, this should be used only for male dogs, as the female form would be "altra ego".

Altman:

Alvar:

Amabilis:

Amadeus:

Amady/Amedy:

Amady:

Amand:

Amantius:

Amarand:

Amaranth:

Amarin:

Amaswinth:

Ambrose:

Amic:

Amico Mio:

Italian for "My Friend", what better way to name a dog and show that you are not narrowly insular at the same time? Similarly "Mi Amigo" "Mein Freund" etc. The feminine form in Italian is "Amica Mia".

Ammian:

Amor:

Amore Mio:

Italian for "my love". Since "amore" is masculine in Italian, this would be best suited to a male rather than a female. Itaian, the most beautiful, the sexiest language in the world.

Amos:

Amphian:

Amphibal:

Amphiloc:

Amulwin:

Anaclet:

Anastase:

Anathalon:

Anatole:

Anaximander:

Anchorman:

Andrew:

Andronic:

Anect:

Angel:

Angelelm:

Anglo-Norman:

refers to the period of the domination in England of the Normans, their language and culture in the centuries following the invasion of England by William the Conqueror in 1066. French was the first language of the Kings of England until Richard II was deposed in 1399: his successor, Henry IV (1399-1413)was the first English king to have English as his mother tongue.

Angovin:

Angus:

Anian:

Anicet:

Annobert:

Anselm:

Ansovin:

Ansuin:

Antares:

Anter:

Anthim:

Antholian:

Antioch:

Antipas:

Antoine:

Anton:

Antonin:

Antonio:

Antony:

Anubis:

Anysius:

Apelles:

Aphraates:

Aphrodisius:

Apodemus:

Apollo:

Apollonius:

Apothecary:

Appian:

Apronian:

Apuleius:

Aquila:

Aquilin:

Aragorn:

Arator:

Arbogast:

Arcadius:

Arcadius:

Archangel:

the highest form of spiritual being below God. Literally "old messenger". Often shown in religious portaiture as having wings. Theoretically sexless, they are normally depicted as men. The names of some of them are known: Michael, Raphael and Gabriel for example. Another mentioned in scripture is Uriel.

Archduke:

a nobleman above the level of duke in artistocratic hierarchy. The most famous archduke was probably Archduke Francis (or Franz) Ferdinand, whose assassination with his wife at Sarajevo in Austrian-occupied Sarajevo in 1914 precipitated the First World War. The female equivalent would be "archduchess".

Archibald:

Archiepiscopacy:

Arctic Fox:

Ardalion:

Ardan:

Ardent Wooer:

Arduin:

Argonaut:

Argos:

Argymir:

Ariald:

Ariosto:

Arise Sir John (or any other name you care to choose):

when the Queen knights a man, she dubs him on the shoulder and says these words, thereby conferring the title.

Aristarch:

Aristide:

Aristion:

Aristobulus:

Aristolubus:

Ariston:

Armageddon:

Armand:

Armentar:

Army Manoeuvres:

perhaps a name which would appeal to an ex-soldier. Note the considerable difference in spelling between the British English spelling, which is identical to the French spelling (the word "manoeuvre" is from French), and the American English spelling "maneuvers".

Arnold:

Arnulph:

Arpeggio:

a swirl of notes heard especially in Baroque music, reminiscent of what is quite common in music for the harp ("arpa" in Italian). There are lots of arpeggi (plural of "arpeggio") in the harpsichord solo in Bach's sublime fifth Brandenburg Concerto. Could be used for dog or bitch but the word in Italian is masculine.

Arrian:

Arsene:

Art Of Seduction:

Artald:

Artax:

Artaxerxes:

Artemas:

Artful Dodger:

a character form Dickens's novel "Oliver Twist" and one of the most memorable of all those in Dickens's canon. He was the head of a group of boy pickpockets, organised by Fagin, another memorable creation of Dickens's rich imagination.

Artful Rogue:

Arthur Dent:

Arthurian Legend:

those medieval poems (for the most part) based on the legendary life of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table go to make up Arthurian legend. They are particularly represented by poems in French, German and English. No-one knows whether an original king from those murky dark ages, when the Celts still populated what was to become England, really existed. In any case, the facts of his life could never correspond to what is recounted in Arthurian legend. There are many translations into intelligible modern English versions around (especially in the Penguin and Oxford University Classics series) so why not sample some? They repay reading. I had to study the Beroul fragment based on the life of Sir Tristan (or Tristram), one of the twelve knights of the Round Table, when at University. More recently, Mark Twain and John Steinbeck have also been stirred to write adventures that took place at King Arthur's court.

As Befits A King:

as is fitting for a king.

As Handsome Does:

As You Are He:

the second line from the Beatles' best song ever, "I Am The Walrus".

Asaph:

Asclepiades:

Aslan:

Asparagus Tip:

Aspren:

Asteric:

Astor:

Astric:

Athanase:

Athenodore:

Athenophore:

Atlantis:

Atticus Finch:

the hero of the classic novel condemning racism and exploitation, "To Kill A Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee.

Attila The Hun:

the historical personage whose very name has become a byword for cruelty owing to his ravaging of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D..

Attilan:

Aubert:

Aubin:

Audifax:

Augustan Age:

Augustine:

Augustus:

Aurelian:

Aurelius:

Auson:

Auspic:

Austregisil:

Austremon:

Auxentius:

Auxian:

Auxibius:

Avak:

Armenian for "great".

Aventine:

one of the seven hills on which the city of Rome was founded (see also: Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal and Viminal).

Avitus:

Avuncular Manner:

from the Latin word for "uncle", i.e. "avunculus" (mother's brother - yes the Romans were far more precise than we are when it comes to differentiating between family relations). It refers to the general quality of tolerance, benevolence and even indulgence that an uncle has towards his nieces and nephews, as opposed to the often stricter attitude adopted by parents or grandparents.

Axel:

Aye Aye Captain:

similar in meaning to the following two entries: especially used in the sixties television series which has acquired a cult following, Star Trek. Used especially by the characters Mr Spock, Scotty and Mr Sulu when formally acknowledging orders given by Captain Kirk.

Aye Aye Sir:

similar to "Aye Aye Skipper".

Aye Aye Skipper:

a pecularly nautical expression uttered by a subordinate to someone of superior rank and meaning "Yes sir". A skipper is the owner or master of a boat, the person who commands, whether the context is a military, naval one or whether the boat is privately owned.

Aymard:

Aymeric:

Azad:

Armenian for "free".

Azadanes:

Azades:

Aztec Prince:

perhaps best used for Mexican breeds - chihuahuas, xoloitzcuintli and so on.

B

Babylas:

Bacchus:

Bach At Midnight:

Bach Fugue:

Johann Sebastian alone is a reason enough to be glad to be alive. He is among the few people who have touched my soul and transported me to another dimension through his sublime music. There are times when I could believe in heaven thanks to him.

Bach Trumpet:

Baggins:

Baggy Trousers:

Bagrat:

Armenian and Georgian boy's name.

Balbinus:

Balderic:

Baldomer:

Baldred:

Baldwin:

Balrog:

Balthasar:

Bandersnatch:

a fabulous creature invented by Lewis Carroll and mentioned fleetingly as "the frumious bandersnatch", the adjective implying that he is "furious" and "fuming". Elsewhere, the bandersnatch is described as quick-moving. We know no more that that.

Bandito:

an outlaw or bandit, aprticularly of Mexican or South American origin. The word is however Italian in origin.

Banjo Boy:

I like the mental image of a dog with a banjo.

Banquo:

Barbasymas:

Barbatian:

Barber Of Seville:

Bardolino:

Barhadbesciabas:

Bari:

Baritone/Barytone:

Barkev:

Armenian for "gift".

Barlaam:

Barn Conversion:

Barnaby Rudge:

a less well-known novel by Charles Dickens. I have often found more enjoyable Dickens's less read novels than the really famous ones. I enjoyed this novel more than I expected.

Barnaby:

Baronial Hall:

a large hall in a medieval building,often owned by a baron and used for banquets (also called "banqueting hall").

Barry Lyndon:

a novel by William Thackeray, one of Britian's best 19th-century novelists, most famous for the masterpiece "Vanity Fair". "Barry Lyndon" is one of his lesser- known works and might still languish in obscurity were it not for the fact that the novel was turned into a film by that genius of the cinema, Stanley Kubrick. It stars Ryan O'Neill and Marisa Berenson. Despite that, it is a masterpiece of the Kubrickian canon. The musical soundtrack alone is worth watching the film for. Of course the greatest presence in the film is not any of the actors but the invisible stamp of Kubrick himself.

Barsanuph:

Bartholomew:

Barypsabas:

Bashful Basil:

Bashful Bernard:

I just love the alliteration. In British English, the stress falls on the first syllable of the name Bernard, in American English, it is on the second.

Bashful Bertie:

"Bertie" is short for "Albert" (usually) and this like the last entry, is a bit of fun. "Bashful" means "shy".

Bashful Lover:

Basil:

Basilian:

Basiliscus:

Baskerville:

Bassian:

Bates Motel:

for horror movie buffs. Don't blame me if your dog turns out to be psycho if you give him a name like this!

Battering Ram:

a large weapon of war, usually made of a stout log suspended on ropes which was used to shatter the doors or gates of medieval castles. If you have a dog that collides with everything or uses his head as a battering ram, then you might give this as his pedigree name. I suppose it could be used for a bitch too but it would not be very feminine. Indeed the word "ram" is the name given to a male sheep, one which has not been neutered. The female equivalent is "ewe".

Battle Cry:

a cry or rallying call uttered by soldiers when going into battle. Also a slogan used by the protagonists of a certain cause, movement or belief.

Bawdy Joke:

Bawdy Tale:

Be Frank:

Beach Boy:

Beano:

apparently, this is another(abbreviated) form of "beanfeast", so please refer to this entry for an explanation of meaning of the word, which now sounds rather old-fashioned. "The Beano" is the name of a children's comic, first published in 1938, which incredibly is still being published weekly.

Beast Of Bodmin:

Beatle:

Beatles Reunion:

Beatus:

Bedazzled:

a literary or poetic word for "dazzled".

Beeblebrox:

Beefeater:

Bel Amour:

French for "great love", "wonderful love". It is masculine in gender so basically it ought to be used only for a male puppy.

Belisarius:

Bell-Bottoms:

Bellboy:

see "Bellhop", of which it is a synonym.

Bellhop:

a bellboy, a young man who at hotels carry guests' luggage to their rooms

Bello:

Belt And Braces:

careful, prudent, not taking chances. A belt or a pair of braces (="suspenders" in American English, though in British English that means something entirely different) can be used to keep up your trousers (= "pants" in American English, though in British English that means something entirely different). However if you wear both belt and braces, you are really hedging your bets. Often used in the expression "a belt and braces policy", a policy of prudence and caution.

Belted Earl:

up to the seventeenth century, an earl was invested by the soveriegn with a sword which was carried on a girdle at his waist, hence the expression, "belted earl". So it would be an aristocrat of ancient lineage, as opposed to those more recenty elevated to the peerage, mere upstart parvenus!

Benedict:

Benefactor:

strictly speaking, a man who does good, who provides money or works for a good cause. The female equivalent is "benefactress".

Bengo:

Benign Mafioso:

a contraduction in terms but I like a good paradox. Perhaps for an Italian breed. Can only be used for a male (female would be "Benign Mafiosa").

Benignus:

Benjamin:

Benno:

Benvenuto (feminine: Benvenuta):

Italian for "welcome".

Beppe:

Berard:

Berencard:

Berengar:

Bernadin:

Bernard:

Berne:

Bernward:

Beronic:

Berthar:

Berthold:

Bertin:

Bertrand:

Bertulph:

Bessarion:

Bet My Bottom Euro:

based on the oft-quoted expression "I('ll) bet my bottom dollar, which is usually American.

Betto:

Bibulous Visage:

Bicor:

Big And Strong:

often used when exhorting children to eat foods which they may not actually enjoy. "If you eat up all your spinach, you'll grow up to be be and strong like Popeye."

Big Ben:

strictly speaking, the bell in the clocktower of the Houses of Parliament. In common parlance however, it has come to mean the clocktower and clock as well. A number of explanations exist as to why "Ben" (Benjamin? Benedict?) was chosen.

Big Boys Don't Cry:

Big Brother:

a mindless programme on commercial television designed to distract the more undiscerning or tasteless elements in society and keep them happy and therefore quiet. Far more importantly, it is the name of the dictator of Oceania, to which what used to be the UK belongs (as Airstrip One)in the world-famous dystopian classic by George Orwell, "1984". The ability to keep a stifling check on society and thus to quell all forms of dissent against Big Brother's totalitarian regime is chilling indeed and one of the most disturbing (and best) books I have ever read. "The outlook is bleak" would be an understatement of life under Big Brother. In fact, his regime was based on that of the USSR imposed by Joseph Stalin in the first half of the twentieth century. Stalin himself has to be a contender for the title of most evil man in history, a psychopath with absolute power. I undertand some Russians and some Georgians consider him as a hero. At that rate, what hope is there for the human race?

Bigwig:

the most important or influential person or people in a group or enterpise, a kingpin. Usually male.

Bijou Bleu:

"blue jewel" in French, intended for a blue dog. In French it is masculine and so would best be given to a male dog.

Bilbo Baggins:

Bilbo:

Bill And Coo:

exchanging intimacies of a more modest kind: kissing cuddling, hugging, whispering sweet nothings to the other person. The sort of intimacy which can be done in public without fear of prosecution (in enlightened countries at any rate). Named after the noises made by doves and pigeons during their courtship rituals. I have included the word under "Male names" only because "Bill", an affectionate form of "William" is a male name - e.g. Bill Clinton.

Bill Of Rights:

A. the 1689 Bill of Rights in the United Kingdom sets out a number of rights of British people but most particularly, it circumscribes the powers of the monarch and thus sets a limit to the powers enjoyed by the crown in a constitutional monarchy. Never before had the monarch's powers been legally delineated and restricted in written form. OR: the first ten amendments to the American Constitution which set out the rights and duties of U.S. citizens. Perhaps the name "Bill" could be given as a pet or call name to a dog bearing this as its official pedigree name.

Bill Stickers:

a humorous suggestion here. When people engage in putting up advertisements illegally in public places ("flyposting" in the UK: it has various names in the USA), they are called "bill stickers" (bill=poster). "Bill(y)" is a diminutive of the name "William". Therefore when local authorities put up warning signs in areas which are particularly prone to flyposting, they are often worded as follows "Bill stickers will be prosecuted". Witty writers of graffiti may append such comments as "Why am I being persecuted like this? Signed, William Stickers". Or "Why victimise Bill Stickers?" and so on.

Billy No Mates:

in English slang, a "mate" is a friend, chum, pal. Billy No Mates is the nickname often given to a boy (if their is an equivalent for girls, I am unaware of it) who has no friends, who is a bit of a loner.

Bird And Bottle:

Bird Magnet:

a man to who women are strongly attracted. In British English slang, a "bird" is a yong woman (similar to the use of the word "chick" in American English). Of course in its literal sense, the expression could indicate a dog that automatically attracts birds of the feathered sort.

Biril:

Birthday Boy:

Bit Of Rough:

Black Bat Night:

Black Beret:

typical of the garb of French peasants, at least in the popular imagination. It is mostly older country-dwellers that still sport the beret (in my experience anyway). Would of course best suit a French breed and indeed a male dog.

Black Guardian:

nice name for a guard dog.

Black Knight:

in films set in medieval times, the black knight is always the baddy. I think they just get a bad press..

Black Mark:

Black Tie:

formal men's attire, usually for evening events. Black tie consists basically of a black dinner jacket ("tuxedo" in American English), black trousers ("pants" in American English), a black tie, often a bow tie, and a white shirts, occasionally with ruffles.It also often includes a cummerbund (q.v.) or a waistcoat ("vest" in American English).

Blackguard:

an old-fashioned or literary word for a villain, a "baddie", an unprincipled wretch, a reprobate, a scoundrel. Note that it is pronounced "blaggard". Sorry I do not have available the symbols of the Internation Phonetic Association to enable me to provide a more accurate pronunciation. The word is almost exclusively reserved for men.

Blackheath:

Blackjack:

Blacksmith:

Blaise:

Blind Man's Buff:

a party game, especially for children, where one person is blindfolded and whose task is then to catch one of the other people in the room, who in turn have to avoid being caught in this way. When the catcher captures another person, he or she then assumes the blindfold and proceeds to capture someone else. It is much more fun to play than to explain.....

Blinlivet:

Blitmund:

Blood Brother:

Blue Peter:

firstly the name of a flag consisting of a central white square surrounded by blue, or if you prefer, a white square surrounded by a blue square. It is flown when a vessel is about to leave port. More popularly however it refers to a magazine programme for children broadcast on BBC television from 1958 to the present day.

Blue-Eyed Boy:

"mother's blue-eyed boy" is a way of saying that in a mother's eyes, her son is perfect, that mothers tend to idealise their sons. Best used for a breed that has blue eyes, collies, huskies, old English sheepdogs,etc.

Bluebeard:

Boatswain:

the foreman of an unlicensed deck crew. Any the wiser? Suffice it to say that he occupied a position of practical importance on a ship. An old-fashioned expression that conjures up Britain's maritime history. The word is pronounced and occasionally written "bosun". Might suit a breed with maritime associations or connected with boats or barges.

Bob's Your Uncle:

used as an exclamation of satisfaction at a job well done and successfully concluded. Frequently used at the end of a series of instructions. For example:"To make great spaghetti you must use fresh spahetti, fresh tomatoes and spices for the sauce. You boil the pasta till it is al dente. You add the sauce to the pasta with some freshly grated parmesan. And Bob's your uncle." It basically means "and you're all set" or "and there you have it".

Bob-A-Job:

the word "bob" was English slang for the now defunct shilling. Before the decimalisation of the British currency where 100 pence (or "p" in colloquial English) amount to one pound, the old pound was divided into twenty shillings, with the shilling being subdivided into twelve pence. The systemm was so complicated it is a wonder it survived so long but you know how much the English are wedded to ancient traditions even if their perceived adbantages are not obvious to anyone outside the country. Once a year, boy scouts, a voluntary youth organisation, founded about a hundred years ago, organised "bob-a-job week", where scouts, either singly or in small groups, would do a job for them around the house in exchange for a shilling (= five pence in modern currency). Where the money thus obtained went I cannot say as I was never a scout. I have included this word as masculine solely because "Bob" is the familiar shortened form of "Robert".

Bobby On The Beat:

Bodagisil:

Bodyguard:

Boghos:

believe it or not, this is the Armenian form of "Paul".

Bogumil:

Bombadil:

Bombardier:

Bonaparte:

the Gallicised surname (in its original Italian form "Buonaparte") of Napoleon I, emperor of the French.

Bonar Law:

Bonaventure:

Bonfilius:

Boniface:

nothing to do with a handsome countenance, this word, borne by several saints and nine popes, basically means "doer of good", not to be confused with the more negative sounding "do-gooder", a favurite insult of the political right for anyone who has a modicum of compassion or humanity in them.

Bonus:

Boomoing Voice:

Bootblack:

Bootleg Whisky:

Bootlegger:

Boris The Beast:

Boris:

Boromir:

Botulph:

Bounty Hunter:

Bowie:

Boy Racer:

Boy Scout:

Boys Will Be Boys:

Brad Majors:

Brains And Brawn:

Brandy:

Branwallader:

Brass Monkey:

Bravado:

Bravado:

Bravo Ragazzo:

Bravo Ragazzo:

Breadwinner:

Bretannion:

Brice:

Bridgebuilder:

Bright Eyes:

apart from the obvious, this was the name of a song aung by Art Garfunkel which reached the Number One slot in 1979 and was the highest selling single of that year. It did not do a thing in the USA. ALthough it is designed to be sentimental, so what? It sometimes still brings a tear to my eyes ahich thereby become less bright. I don't like having my emotions tugged about willy-nilly like that but on the other hand, Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You" produces an even more lachrymose reaction in me than this little number.

Brindisi:

Britannicus:

Brito:

Broadsword:

Bruges:

Brunello:

Bruno:

Buccaneer:

Bullseye:

Bunch Of Fives:

Burchard:

Burglar Bill:

Buries The Hatchet:

Business Magnate:

Business Tycoon:

Busman's Holiday:

Butt Of Malmsey:

Buttons:

Buzzati:

By Jove:

Byronic Hero:

Byzantium:

C

Caber-Tossing

Caelian:

one of the seven hills on which the city of Rome was founded (see also: Aventine, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal and Viminal).

Caesar:

Caiaphas:

Caius:

Cajetan:

Caleb:

Calepod:

Caletric:

Caliban:

Caligula:

Calimer:

Caliph:

Calixt:

Call Of Duty:

Call Of The Wild:

Jack London's famous novel about man's inhumanity, the central character of which is a dog-wolf hybrid. There are at least two breeds of dog recognised by the FCI (if you aren't familiar, do your own resaerch - don't expect me to spoonfeed you), namely the Saarloos Wolfhond and the Czechoslovak Wolf Dog. The latter is more common in Europe, but the former in my opinion is more elegant.

Call To Arms:

Callinic:

Calliop:

Calmin:

Caloger:

Calupan:

Camelian:

Campaign Manager:

Candid:

Canis:

Cannonball:

Canny Scot:

Canopus:

Cantidian:

Canute:

Cap In Hand:

Capability Brown:

Caped Crusader:

Capitoline:

one of the seven hills on which the city of Rome was built (see also: Aventine, Caelian, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal and Viminal).

Capodanno:

Captain Corelli:

Car Salesman:

Caracalla:

Caradoc:

Caravaggio:

Card Shark:

Cardinal Virtue:

Carilefus:

Carinus:

Carolingian:

Carouser:

Carpathian:

Carpohore:

Carpon:

Carus:

Casimir:

Caspar:

Cassian:

Cassius:

Castor:

originally the name of one of the heavenly twins (whence the star sign Gemini). It derives from the Greek word for "beaver" and is also the French word for that animal. Furthermore it is the name of several Christian saints. (See also under "Pollux").

Castritian:

an early Christian saint and bishop of Milan in the second century. Derived from the Latin word for "castrated", it dates from an era when total chastity was considered a virtue to be admired and advocated.

Castulus:

Christian saint and martyr, third century. Chamberlain to the emperor Diocletian. A church in Prague also bears his name.

Castus:

name of (at least) two Christian saints. The word is Latin for "chaste".

Catald:

Christian saint from Ireland, companion of St Patrick. "Cathal" is used as a Christian name in Ireland and was Latinised to "Cataldus".

Cato:

Catulin:

Caucasus:

Cavalier Fashion:

Cavalier:

Cavalryman:

Caveat Emptor:

Cecil:

Cecilian:

Cedric:

Celeborn:

Celerin:

Christian saint from Africa who lived in the third century. Based on the Latin word for "quick" or "fast": "a little quickie" might be a literal translation.

Celestine:

Celsus:

Celtic Bard:

Celtic Warrior:

Centre Forward:

Centre Left:

Centurion:

a Roman soldier in charge of a "century" which in reality usually meant 83 men rather than a hundred.

Cerberus:

Cerbon:

Ceremonial Sword:

Chad:

a country in Africa but also the name of a prominent Anglo-Saxon saint whose life and works are recounted in the works of the father of English literature, Bede. The name itself is not of Anglo-Saxon but of British Celtic origin. It is a common name among Welsh princes in the seventh century and derives from a word for "battle". Up to you what sort of dog you give the name to.

Charalampias:

Charbel:

Charioteer:

Chariton:

Charles:

Chaste Eros:

Chaucer:

Cheeky Chappy:

Cheeky Charlie:

Cheery Chap:

Cheledon:

Cherchez La Femme:

Chiaro E Tondo:

Chief Inspector:

Chieftain:

Childeric:

Chimney Sweep:

Chimneysweep:

Chippendale:

Christmas Cigar:

Christopher:

name of a Christian saint but he appears never to have existed. The name is still popular in Christian and post-Christian countries, meaning "bearer of Christ". Often popularly abbreviated to "Chris".

Chromat:

St Chromatius was bishop of the Roman city of Aquileia, in North-Eastern Italy in the fourth and fifth centuries. Although relatively small now, the town was once much bigger and played a prominent role in the history of the Catholic church. Derives from the Greek word for "colour", so if you have a colourful dog (merle, tricolour, with patches), this may be the name for him.

Chrysanth:

Chrysogon:

a Catholic saint, martyred at the beginning of the third century in Aquileia, north-eastern Italy. Patron saint of Zadar in Croatia.

Chrysostom:

Churchill:

Ciao Bello:

Cicero:

Cimabue:

City Slicker:

Civvy Street:

Clan Chieftan:

Clarence:

a name derived from the Irish county (and river) Clare. Possibly from the Latin word for "bright" or "clear". First used as a first name in the nineteenth century, it became popular for a while but now sounds hopelessly old-fashioned. Could still be used (like "Cecil", "Egbert" or "Mildred") as a mildly humorous name for a dog. Also the name of the lion in the American safari series "Daktari". Anyone still remember that?

Claude:

while this name is very old-fashioned in English-speaking countries, it remains very popular in France, Italy and Spanish-speaking countries. Why it should be so out-dated in Britain and the USA is incomprehensible - maybe a name which is due for a revival in popularity. My hairdresser's name in Belgium is Claude so if he ever reads this glossary, "Salut, Claude!". The name could also be given to a dog as a call name; after all, it is short, cannot be abbreviated and is easy to spell.

Clavichord:

Clavius:

Claymore:

Clean Sweep:

Clement Weather:

Clement Weather:

Clement:

Clement:

Clementin:

Climax:

Cloth Cap:

Clovis:

Co-Pilot:

Cockadoodledoo:

Coeur de Lion:

Cogitosus:

Collar And Tie:

Colman:

the name of several saints of Irish origin. Nothing to do with mining (note the spelling!).

Colonel Blimp:

Columba:

Irish saint who had a huge influence on the Church in the sixth century and beyond. The name is Latin for "dove", which of course has much symbolism in Christianity (the dove of peace, God the Holy Ghost). A man's name despite the fact that it ends in an "A".

Columban:

Come Back Jacques:

Come-Back Kid:

Coming On Strong:

Common Purpose:

sharing the same objectives or outlook.

Computer Geek:

Comus:

Conan:

Conon:

Conrad:

Constant:

Constantian:

Constantine:

Contains Nuts:

Content:

Convoyon:

Conwall:

Cool Smoothie:

Corbican:

Corbinian:

Cordon Bleu:

denoting something of great quality or intrinsic worth in the sphere of gastronomy. The French expression (literally translation: "blue cord/ribbon")is often used in English-speaking countries. For example: "He is a great cordon bleu chef." Best used for a blue dog.

Corentin:

Cornel:

Corsair:

Cosmo:

Count Moriarty:

Country Boy:

Country Squire:

County Sheriff:

Coureur De Jupons:

"ladies' man" in French.

Court Jester:

Court Minstrel:

Coxcomb:

Crafty Devil:

Crafty Eyeful:

Crescentian:

Crew Cut:

Crispin:

Crispinian:

Crixus:

in the Gallic language, before Latin took a hold in Gaul, the word from which this Latinised form comes meant "curly-haired". It is the name borne by one of the leaders, with the legendary Spartacus, of the Third Servile War. This is often assumed to be a war by escaped gladiators against tyranny and exploitation under the Roman Republic, but Spartacus's motives for armed struggle against Rome have never concusively been proved to be those of an idealistic freedom-fighter. Crixus met his end in battle against Roman military forces in 72 B.C. In view of the meaning of the word, it would be perfect for a curl-coated retriever, poodle, or indeed any other breed with curly hair.

Crown Prince:

Crusader Castle:

Cucuphas:

Cuddly Dudley:

Cuddly Teddy:

Cumian:

Cumian:

Cupcake:

Cupid:

Curcodom:

Curomot:

Cuthbert:

Cuthman:

Cymbeline:

Cynibild:

Cyprian:

Cyran:

Cyrano:

Cyriac:

Cyril:

Cyrin:

Cyrion:

Cyrus:

Czar:

Czech Liszt:

D

Dad's Army:

Daddy Cool:

Daddy-Long-Legs:

Daedalus:

Dalek:

Dalesman:

Dam Buster:

Damas:

Damian:

Dandelion Clock:

Dandy:

Daniel Deronda:

a novel by George Eliot, Britain's best woman novelist to my mind, and dealing, initer alia, with antisemitism.

Daniel Deronda:

Daniel:

Dante:

Dapper And Spry:

Dapper Dresser:

Daredevil:

Dark Brown Voice:

Dark-Age Warrior:

Darwin:

Dashing Hero:

David Bowman:

one of the two main human characters in Stanley Kubrick's classic film "2001 A Space Odyssey", played in the film by Keir Dullea. Love this film even though it is ultimately incomprehensible.

David:

Davinus:

Deadly Earnest:

very seriously, without any joking or frivolity at all. The full expression is: "in deadly earnest."

Dean Spanley:

a rather strange but enjoyable film about dogs and reincarnation released in 2008 and directed by Toa Fraser. Inspired by a short story based on similar precepts by Lord Dunsany, a rather strange Victorian man of letters.

Deathless Hero:

Debonair Air:

Decuman:

Deep And Sonorous:

Deep Baritone:

Deep Bass:

Deerstalker:

Defiance:

Defies Logic:

Deft Footwork:

Deimos:

Delboy:

Delinquent:

Delphin:

Demetrian:

Demi-God:

Demijohn:

Democritus:

Demon Barber:

Demon Driver:

Denis:

Denzil:

Dermot:

Derring-Do:

heroic daring. The swashbuckling adventures of pirates in films of the twenties, thirties and forties, the films of Errol Flynn or any number of books about pirates or hunters, written basically for boys in the interwar period, are full of deeds of derring-do. Not much used these days, and the tongue-in-cheek atmosphere in the "Pirates of the Caribbean" rather diminishes the derring-do element in them.

Designer Stubble:

Desperado:

Deus Ex Machina:

Dimitri:

Dino Buzzati:

Diocletian:

Diodor:

Dioscor:

Disibod:

Disraeli:

Dobbin:

Doctor Potts:

Doctor Who:

the longest running science fiction series in the world and still going strong fifty years after its first broadcast in 1963. It centres around a humanoid alien, the Doctor (he is not named) who has a machine which travels through time as well as space and is stuck in the form of an old British police box (in the 1960s, the police had special police boxes painted blue rather than red and of which they had exclusive use). This machine, called the Tardis, is much bigger on the inside than on the outside. The Doctor himself changes shape every so often and is a time lord from the planet Gallifrey. Yes, I've been a fan since the first episodes but my favourite Doctor is and always has been the slightly sinister and irascible William Hartnell, who was also the first doctor.

Doff Your Hat:

Doge's Palace

Doge's Palace

Doge's Palace:

Doge's Palace:

Dogfan:

Dogmael:

Dominic:

Domino:

Domitian:

Don Giovanni:

Don Juan:

Don Quixote:

Donald:

Donat:

Donatian:

Donus:

Dorian Gray:

Doting Dad/Father:

attentive and devoted father. Perhaps needless to say, "dad" is more informal than "father".

Dotty Boffin:

Double-O-Seven:

Doubting Thomas:

Doughty Knight:

Doughty Warrior:

Dour Scot:

Down In One:

Downing A Draft:

Dr Frank N. Furter:

Dr Jekyll:

Dr Lang:

Dr No:

Dr Strangelove:

Dr von Scott:

Draft Dodger:

Dreadnought:

Dredlock:

Drink And Be Merry:

Drinking Song:

Droctoveus:

Drostan:

Drummer Boy:

Drummer:

Dubbin:

Ducks And Dives:

a term form boxing, describing the way in which a boxer tries to avoid getting hit by his (her) opponent. Similar to "ducking and weaving" (qv).

Ducks And Weaves

a term from boxing, describing the moves a boxer has to make to avoid receiving the blows of his (her) opponent. See also "Ducks And Dives"

Dulcard:

Dumb Waiter:

Duncan:

Dunstan:

Dutiful Husband:

Dutiful Son:

Dylan:

Dzaglika:

the Georgian word for "dog". Go on, how much more original can you get, outside Georgia?

E

Each To His Own:

Eager Beaver:

Earl Grey:

Ebenezer:

Ecce Canis:

Eddy The Teddy:

Edmund:

Edward:

Edwin:

Effluvium:

Egbert:

Egmont:

Egyptian God:

El Cid:

El Dorado:

Elder Brother:

Elder Statesman:

Elder Statesman:

Elector:

Eleuther:

Elmo:

Elrond:

Emeric:

Emil:

Emile Zola:

Emilian:

Emir:

Emperor Symphony:

Emperor Symphony:

Emperor:

Enchanter:

Endellion:

Endymion:

Enters The Fray:

Epimach:

Erasmus:

Erebus:

Eric Not Ernie:

Eric The Half-Bee

Erith:

Ermenfrid:

Ernest:

Ernie Not Eric:

Errand-Boy:

Escaped Convict:

Eshkhan:

Armenian for "prince".

Espresso:

Esquiline:

one of the seven hills on which the city of Rome was built (see also: Aventine, Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal and Viminal).

Estragon:

Ethan:

Eugene:

Eugenian:

Eugyppius:

Eupsych:

Euripides:

Euro:

Eusebe:

Eustace:

Euthym:

Eutych:

Eutychian:

Evarist:

Evermund:

Every Inch A Hero:

Every Man Jack:

Everyday Hero:

Everyday Hero:

Excalibur:

Exclamation Mark:

Exupery:

Ezekiel:

Ezra:

F

Fabian:

Facund:

Fairfax:

"Doer of good"; the first name of Mr Rochester in Charlotte Brontë's masterpiece "Jane Eyre".

Faithful Ruslan:

Falco:

Fallen Hero:

Falstaff:

Family Guy:

Family Jules:

Family Man:

Faruq:

Father Christmas:

Father Mackenzie:

Father Of The Man:

from the aphorism "The child is father of the man", that is, our experiences in childhood are helpful to us even when we are grown up. From a poem by Wordsworth "My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky".

Father Time:

Father-In-Law:

Fatherland:

Faustinian:

Fearless Warrior:

Feat Of Strength:

Felician:

Felix:

Fenodyree:

a mythical hairy sprite or brownie from Manx folklore. Might suit a small hairy dog.

Feral Beast:

Ferdinand:

Fergus:

Ferryman:

Fickle Hero:

Fidel:

Fidolin:

Fidweten:

Fine Fellow:

Finely Wrought:

Fingal's Cave:

Finian:

Finnigan's Wake:

Fire God:

Firedrake:

Firmian:

Firmin:

Fit For A King:

Fits The Bill:

Flapjack:

Flared Trousers:

Flash Harry:

Flaubert:

Flavian:

Flawed Hero:

Flight Of Icarus:

Florent:

Florestan:

name of a prince of Monaco in the 19th century.

Florian:

Floribert:

Flosculus:

Flying Picket:

Foaming Flaggon:

Following Orders:

Foot Soldier:

Footpad:

Ford Prefect:

Forest Timber:

Forgotten Hero:

Formose:

Formula One:

Fornax:

Fortissimo:

Fosco:

Founding Father:

Francis:

Frank Admission:

Frank Candour:

Frank Confession:

Frank Discussion:

Frank Poole:

one of the two main human characters in Stanley Kubrick's msterpiece "2001 A Space Odyssey", played by Gary Lockwood. One of my favourite films of all time even though the ending is ultimately incomprehensible.

Fraternity:

Fredegand:

Fredegar:

Frederick:

Free Kick:

Friar Tuck:

Friar's Tonsure:

Frodo:

Frodobert:

From Father To Son:

Fromund:

Front Man:

Fuego:

Fulbert:

Fulcran:

Fulgent:

Fulk:

Full And Frank:

Full Frank Debate:

Full Monty:

Fully Loaded:

Fuscian:

Fusilier:

Fymbert:

G

Gabriel:

Gageric:

Gaius:

Galahad:

Galant Attempt:

Galant Suitor:

Galba:

Galdin:

Galileo Figaro:

Galileo Galilei:

Gallic Gallantry:

Gallican:

Gallien:

Gamekeeper's Lad:

Gamekeeper:

Gamelbert:

Gamewarden:

Gamgee:

Gandalf The Grey:

Gandalf The White:

Gandalf:

Ganesh:

Gangulph:

Ganymede:

Garard:

Garden Gnome:

Gargantua:

Gargantua:

Garibald:

Gaston:

Gatian:

Gavin:

Gawain:

Gelase:

Geminian:

General Approval:

General Assembly:

General Picture:

General Release:

Gennady:

Gentle Giant:

Gentleman Caller:

Gentleman Farmer:

Gentleman Jim:

Geoffrey:

George Frederick:

George:

Georgy Porgy:

Gerald:

Gerasim:

Gerebrand:

Gerin:

Germinal:

Gerontius:

Gerulph:

Gervase:

Get Ahead Get A Hat:

Geta:

Giancarlo:

Giant's Causeway:

Gideon:

Gigolo:

Giles:

Gilgamesh:

Gimli:

Giorgione:

Giotto:

Give Him His Due:

Give Me Strength:

Give Me Strength:

Gladstone:

Glastian:

Glorfindel:

Glycerius:

Goal Kick:

Godfrey:

Godo:

Gold Prospector:

Goldfinger:

Gollum:

Gondolier:

Gone Fishing:

Good Boy:

Good Guy:

Good Nick:

"in good nick" is a slang expression for "in good condition".

Good Samaritan:

Good Sport:

Good Sportsman:

Good-Time Girl:

Gordian:

Gorgeous George:

Gosbert:

Government Bill:

Grand Duke:

Grand Prix Driver:

Grand Vizir:

Gratian:

Great-Grandad:

Great-Grandson:

Great-Uncle:

Greek Hero:

Gregory:

Grenadier:

Grendel:

Greybeard:

Grigio:

Grim Reaper:

while I am quite happy to encourage people to be different, I think if you give this name to your dog, you may be going a little too far. The grim reaper is the personification of death: it usually takes the form of a cloaked figure with a scythe (for reaping souls) on its shoulder and when it eventually reveals its head, it is a human skull, a death's head. It was used in a very funny sketch in Monty Python's "Meaning of Life", the sketch on death, where a dinner party ends with the collective death by food poisoning of the assembled company. Nonetheless I would urge you to think twice before giving this name to your dog. Mind you, you could be certain of finding very few, if any, others bearing the same name.

Grimbald:

Gringo:

Grinling:

Gritty Reality:

Grocer Jack:

Grocer Ted:

Gruntfuttock:

Grytpipe-Thynne:

Gudwal:

Guerembald:

Gulstan:

Gumesind:

Gung-Ho (Approach/Attitude):

Gung-Ho:

Gunslinger:

Gustave:

Gut Feeling:

Guthlac:

Gyavire:

H

Habakkuk:

Habsburg Emperor:

Hadelin:

Hail Caesar:

Hal Nine Thousand:

Hale-Bopp:

Half The Battle:

Half-Sovereign:

Hallelujah Chorus:

probably the best known and instantly recognisable part of Handel's oratorio "Messiah". However there are many other unforgettable musical delights in the work even for those who, like me, prefer their classical music unsung so if you don't know it, give it a go.

Hallvard:

Hamilcar:

Hamish:

Hamlet:

Hammer Of Destiny:

Handsome Blue/Grey/Black/Yellow/White,etc.:

Handsome Brute:

Handsome Gesture:

Handsome Reward:

Handsome Rogue:

Handsome Tribute:

Handyman:

Hannibal:

Hanover:

Hansel:

Hansom Cab:

Happy As A Sandboy:

Happy As Larry:

Happy As Ulysses:

Harbourmaster:

the official in charge of a harbour.

Hard Taskmaster:

Hard-Fought Race

Harold:

Harris Tweed:

Harvey:

Hasdrubal:

Have-A-Go Hero:

Have-A-Go Joe:

He Who Dares

He Who Laughs Last:

Head Boy:

Head Gardner:

Headmaster:

Heathcliff:

Heavy Artillery:

Heavy Work-Out:

Heavyweight Hero:

Hector:

Hegesipp:

Helier:

Heliodore:

Hello Sailor:

Helm's Deep:

Helmsman:

Hendrix:

Henry Crun:

Henry:

Herbert:

Herculean Effort:

Herculean Labour:

Herculean Task:

Hercules:

Hereward The Wake:

Hereward:

Heribert:

Herman:

Hermenegild:

Hermenland:

Hero And Villain:

Hero Of Legend:

Hero Worship:

Hero's Welcome:

Herodion:

Herodotus

Heroic Defiance:

Herulph:

Hesiod:

Hesych:

Hey Joe:

Hidulph:

Hieronymus Bosch:

High Priest:

High-Water Mark:

High-Water Mark:

Highland Chief:

Highwayman:

Hijack:

Hilarion:

Hilary:

Hildebert:

Hildebrand:

Hildegrin:

Hildemar:

Hildward:

Hippolyt/Hippolytus:

Hired Assassin:

Hirsute Hunk:

His Cotton Socks:

His Excellency:

His Last Bow:

His Line Goes On:

His Lordship:

His Nibs:

Hit The Road Jack:

Hitchcock:

Hobson's Choice:

Homer:

Honest Deceit:

Honest Labour:

Honest Toil:

Honor:

Honoré de Balzac:

Hoodlum:

Hooray Henry:

Horace:

Horatio:

Horatio:

Horatio:

Hormisdas:

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Hostilian:

Roman emperor briefly in 251, one of only 13 emperors to have died in office of natural causes (Wikipedia dixit). He ruled jointly with Emperor Trebonian.

Hot Rabbit:

Houdini:

Hubert:

Hugh:

Humphrey:

Humpty Dumpty

Hunter Gatherer:

Hunter-Gatherer:

Hunter:

Huntsman:

Hurdy-Gurdy Man:

Hygin:

Hyperechios:

Hyperion:

Hypnos:

I

I Am He:

I Am The Egg-Man:

I Am The Walrus:

I Presume:

I'm A Boy:

apart from the obvious, this is also the title of a hit single by The Who in 1966 about a boy who is brought up like a girl because that is the sex his mother would have preferred. He rebels against this imposed role.

I'm All Right Jack:

I'm Just A Poor Boy:

I'm Not Your Daddy:

Iago:

Ian:

Icarus:

Ideal Husband:

Idle Fellow:

Idomeneus:

Idris:

Ignatius:

Igor:

Illadan:

Illy:

Imbert:

In Deadly Earnest:

In Every Port:

In General Terms:

Inbuilt Strength:

Incomunicado:

Indract:

Inigo:

Innocent:

Irenaeus:

Iron Filings:

Irons In The Fire:

Isaac:

Ischyrion:

Isidore:

Istar:

in Tolkien's Middle Earth, this word means "wizard".

Italo:

Ithamar:

Ivan:

Ivanhoe:

J

Jaberwock:

Jack Be Nimble:

Jack Be Quick:

Jack Frost:

Jack Horner:

Jack In The Box

Jack In The Pulpit:

Jack O'Lantern

Jack Of All Trades:

Jack Robinson:

Jack Sprat:

Jack The Lad:

Jack-Knife:

Jackanapes:

Jackdaw Black:

Jagger Lips:

Jambert:

James:

January:

Jarlath:

Jasper:

Jealous Guy:

Jerome:

Jet:

Jethro:

Jeune Et Beau:

Jilted John:

Jivan:

Armenian boy's name

Joachim:

Job's Comforter:

Jodoc:

Joe Bloggs:

Joe Le Taxi:

Joe's Café:

Johann Sebastian:

John Barleycorn:

John Bull:

John Hates Maths:

John:

Johnny On The Spot:

Joins Battle:

Jolly Good Fellow:

Jolly Jack Tar:

Jolly Roger:

Jolyon:

Jonathan:

Jorand:

Jordan:

Joseph:

Joshua:

Josiah:

Journeyman:

Jovial Host:

Jovian:

Jovinian:

Jucundian:

Jude The Obscure:

Jude:

Juggernaut:

Julius:

Junian:

Jupiter:

Juryman:

Just A Gigolo:

Just William:

Juvenal:

K

Kafka:

Kaiser Bill:

Kalmyk:

Karamazov:

Kazan:

Keats:

Keble:

Keen Sportsman:

Kenelm:

Kenneth:

Kentigern:

Kenton:

Kermit:

Kerouac:

Kerry:

Keverne:

Kevork:

the Armenian word for "George".

Khan:

Kilian:

Catholic saint and missionary, originally from Ireland but did most of his work in Franconia (today, the northern part of Bavaria).

Kilian:

King And Country:

King Emperor:

in the days of the British raj in India, this title was bestowed on the king of the United Kingdom, one of whose other titles was Emperor of India. Imperialism at its highest and most absurd one might argue.... The female equivalent was Queen Empress (q.v.)

King Fantastic:

!

King For A Day:

King Lear:

King Marvellous:

King Of The Castle:

King's English:

King's Evidence:

King's Jester:

King's Ransome:

King-Size:

King:

Kingdom Come:

Kingmaker:

Kingsley:

Kingsmark:

a fifth-century Scottish saint and chieftain, venerated in Wales (apparently). Also spelt Cynfarch which links it to such words as "cynology", the word derived from the ancient Greek (not Scottish gaelic or Welsh) for "dog", meaning the study of dogs.

Kipling:

Kiral:

Kirkwall:

Kismet Hardy:

Knight Errant:

Knight In Armour:

Knight Templar:

Knight:

Kouros:

Kraken:

Krikor:

the Armenian equivalent of "Gregory".

Kronos:

Krypton:

Kubrick:

Kudos:

Kummel:

"caraway" in German (cf: "cumino" in Italian and "cumin" in French. Also a liqueur flavoured with caraway.

Kyoshi:

Kyrie:

L

L'Etat C'est Moi:

Ladies' Man:

Lambert Simnel:

Lambert:

Lambrusco:

Lamplighter:

when street-lighting was first introduced, in the nineteenth century, it was prodiced not of course by electricity, but gas. This had to be ignited by a lamplighter. I remember an old gas-fired lamp-post, long since defunct, in an alley-way in Oxford in the 1970s. Lamplighters were invariably men since they went about their business in the eveving and at night in small urban thoroughfares - no job for a lady in those days.

Lanceric:

Land Grab:

Landelin:

Landeric:

Landlubber:

someone who does not work at sea, or is unused to doing so. The term, which sounds old-fashioned these days, is more associated in people's minds with eighteenth- and nineteenth-century sea-farers. It can also be used more pejoratively by a seasoned mariner for an inexperienced sailor.

Lando:

Landulf:

twelfth-century Italian saint.

Lanfranc:

Lanfric:

Laserian:

Latimer:

Latin Grammarian:

Latin Lover:

Laurence:

Laurian:

Law Unto Himself:

Lawdog:

sixth-century Welsh saint.

Lazarus:

Le Grand Meaulnes:

Le Hameau du Roi:

Leading Actor:

Leading Man:

Leander:

Legal Guardian:

Legendary Hero:

Lemuel Gulliver:

Lennon Lives On:

Leo:

Leobard:

Leonian:

Leontius:

Leopold:

Leprachaun:

Leroy Was Here:

Leviathan:

Liafdag:

Danish saint and martyr in the tenth-century Jutland: killed by local pagan. Unusual to have a Scandinavian Roman Catholic saint.

Liberation Hero:

Liberius:

Libert:

Licinius:

Liege Lord:

Lieutenant:

in British English, the correct pronunciation is "leftenant", in American, "lootenant".

Like A Colossus:

Like Billy-Ho:

Likely Lad:

Limoncello:

Linus:

Lionel:

Lionheart:

Little Boy Blue:

Little Einstein:

Little Sir Echo:

Lively Lad:

Livy:

Local Hero:

Loki:

Lone Shark:

Longfellow:

Lord And Master:

Lord Asriel:

Lord Cut Glass:

Lord Effingham:

Lord Mayor:

Lord Of The Manor:

Lord Of The Rings:

Lord Protector:

Lord Sauron:

Lord Sepulcrave:

Lord Snooty:

Lord Wibbley:

Lord Willing:

Lording It:

Lordly Baron:

Lost Masterpiece:

Lothar:

Louis:

Lounge Lizard:

Lovable Vilain:

Love Rat:

Loyal Henchman:

Loyal Retainer:

Lucian:

Lucillian:

Lucius:

Ludger:

Ludwin:

Luke:

Lumberjack:

Luperc:

Lycarion:

Egyptian martyr: nothing whatever is known about him.

Lyutis:

M

Macbeth:

Macedon:

Machiavellian:

Macrinus:

Mad Hatter:

Mad Scientist:

Maelstrom:

Maestro:

Mafia Boss:

Mafioso:

Magellan:

Magic Snowman:

Magnentius:

Magneric:

Magnus:

Magwitch:

Maharajah:

Mahatma:

Major Benefit:

Major Bloodnok:

Major Challenge:

Major Commitment:

Major Criterion:

Major Difference:

Major Difficulty:

Major Distraction:

Major Escalation:

Major Exception

Major Incident:

Major Major:

Major Offensive:

Major Renovation:

Major Rethink:

Major Tom:

Major Unrest:

Major Upheaval:

Majorian:

Majoric:

Makepeace:

Malcolm:

Mamertin:

Man About Town:

Man Friday:

Man In Black:

Man In The Middle:

Man In The Mirror:

Man Of Few Words:

Man Of Leisure:

Man Of The Match:

Man Of The Moment:

Man Of The World:

Man On A Mission:

Man With A Plan:

Man's Best Friend:

Manservant:

Mappalic:

Marcel Proust:

Marcel:

Marcellian:

Marcellin:

Marcian:

Mardig:

Armenian for "warrior"

Margrave:

Marian:

Mark My Words:

Mark:

Marker Buoy:

Marksman:

Maroveus:

Marquis:

Mars:

Martial:

Martian:

Martin:

Martinian:

Maruthas:

Marvin:

Master Chef:

Master Class:

Master Mariner:

Master Of Arts:

Master Plan:

Master Puppeteer:

Master Stroke:

Masterclass:

Mastermind:

Masterstroke:

Mathurin:

Matinee Idol:

Matinée Idol:

Matronian:

Matthew And Son:

Matthew:

Maupassant:

Maurice:

Maurus:

Max Havelaar:

Maxence:

Maxentiol:

Maxim:

Maximian:

Maximilian:

Maximin:

May Contain Nuts:

Mean Mr Mustard:

Mederic:

Medicine Man:

Mein Freund:

Melasipp:

Melasipp:

Melchior:

Meldrew Musings:

Mellors:

Mephistopheles:

Merchant Banker:

Mercurial:

Mercury:

Meriadoc:

Merlin:

Merry Monarch:

Mervyn:

Mesrop:

Armenian saint and the deviser of the very beautiful but complex Armenian alphabet.

Meteorite:

Method Actor:

Methuselah:

Metrophan:

Mexican Bandit:

Mi Amigo:

Michael:

Michelangelo:

Micromegas:

a brilliant short story (shortish) by Voltaire satirising the foibles and arrogance of mankind. It involves two giants from outer space who visit earth and the interaction between them and their hosts. Voltaire is a writer of wit and genius who should be read much more often than he seems to be. His best known work is the classic "Candide". "Micromegas" derives from the words "tiny" and "huge" in Ancient Greek and "micro" and "mega" are frequently found even now as suffixes for neologisms in English.

Midan:

Midas:

Midnight Cowboy:

Midnight Rambler:

Mighty Oak:

Milan:

Miles Per Hour:

Miles Per Hour:

Military Fanfare:

Miltiades:

Milton:

Mimmo:

Mine's A Pint:

Minstrel:

Minstrels' Gallery:

Miroslav:

Mithrandir:

Moderan:

Modern Hero:

Mon Ami:

Mon Copain:

Mon Pote:

Monald:

Monastic Calm:

Monastic Order:

Monkshood:

Monty Python:

Morand:

patron saint of wine-growers

Mordor:

More Tea Vicar:

Morpheus:

Morris Dancer:

Mot de Cambronne:

Mr Barker To You:

Mr Bean:

Mr Chad:

Mr Chuzzlewit:

Mr City Policeman:

Mr Cleese:

Mr Darcy:

Mr Disraeli:

Mr Fix-It:

Mr Gladstone:

Mr Gumby:

Mr Know-All:

Mr Micawber:

Mr Minute:

Mr Nice Guy:

Mr Pastry:

Mr Pecksniff:

Mr Plod:

Mr Postman:

Mr President:

Mr Punch:

Mr Punctuality:

Mr Quiverful:

Mr Quiverful:

Mr Right:

Mr Sensible:

Mr Speaker:

Mr Tambourine Man:

Mr Wonderful:

Mucho Macho:

Mulder:

Multatuli:

Multus In Parvo:

Latin for a lot in a small container, literally "a lot in a little", and of course it means that the dog in question is full of life or intelligence or bravery so do not judge him by his appearence. The equivalent for a bitch would be "Multa In Parva", if my Latin of fifty years or so ago is accurately remembered.

Mumbo Jumbo:

Mummy's Boy:

Mungo:

Musketeer:

My Beamish Boy:

My Best Chum:

My Boy Lollipop:

My Dear Fellow:

rather dated expression, indicating a degree of friendship with the person so addressed.

My Dear Watson:

My Hero:

My Home My Castle:

My Noble Lord:

My Other Brother:

My Own Master:

My Sweet Lord:

My Uncle Oscar:

Mycroft Holmes:

Mythological God:

N

Namphanion:

Napoleon:

Natalis:

Nathan The Wise:

Neat Whisky:

undiluted whisky; whisky drunk straight without any additions, such a water.

Nebbiolo:

Neddie Seagoon:

Negus:

Neil Armstrong:

Nelson My Hero:

Neophyte:

Nephon:

Nepotian:

Neptune:

Nero:

Nerva:

Nerval:

Nestor:

Never A Fool:

be careful! This is the beginning of an old dictum "There's never a fool like an old fool", which is ageist and impolite. As it stands, "Never A Fool" may be quite an attractive name for a dog but it is part of a longer more spiteful saying.

Never A Fool:

be careful! This is the beginning of an old dictum "There's never a fool like an old fool", which is ageist and impolite. As it stands, "Never A Fool" may be quite an attractive name for a dog but it is part of a longer more spiteful saying.

Never Misses:

Neville:

New Statesman:

Nexus:

Nicander:

Nice One Cyril:

Nicephor:

Nicetas:

Nicholas:

Nicodemus:

Nicon:

Nigel:

Nightwatchman:

Nilammon:

Nimbus:

Nimrod:

Ninian:

Nino:

Nithard:

No Fisticuffs:

No Man Is An Island:

No More Mr Nice Guy:

No Ordinary Joe:

No Room For Heroes:

No Way José:

No Woman No Cry:

Noah's Ark:

Noble King:

Noble Mien:

Nobleman:

Nocino:

Noggin The Nog:

Nonchalant Nigel:

Nonnosus:

Norbert:

Norman Bates:

Norman Conquest:

Norseman:

Nostrian:

Nostromo:

Not A Betting Man:

Nouveau-Riche:

Novatian:

Nowhere Man:

Nulli Secundus:

Numerian:

Numidic:

Nut Roast:

Nuts In May:

O

Oak:

Oarsman:

Oberon:

Oblomov:

Octavian:

Octavius:

Odd Man Out:

Odd Man Out:

Odd Man Out:

Odd Man Out:

Odd-Man-Out:

Odin:

Odo:

Odoric:

Of Mice And Men:

Ogden:

Ogmund:

Catholic saint from Iceland - and there aren't many of them!

Oh René:

Old As Methuselah:

Old Bailey:

Old Boy Network:

Old Campaigner:

Old Campaigner:

Old Devil Moon:

Old Father Thames:

Old Father Time:

Old Flat Top:

Old John Roan:

Old Macdonald:

Old Master:

Old Nick:

a colloquial name for the devil.

Old-Timer:

Older Brother:

Oleg:

Oliver Twist:

Oliver's Army:

Oliver:

Ollegar:

Olybrius:

Omar:

Omar:

On Sentry Duty:

One For The Ladies:

One Man One Vote:

One Of The Boys:

One Over The Eight:

slightly drunk, tipsy. The expression comes from British army slang. It was, in the earlier half of the twentieth century, considered that men could drink eight glasses of beer without the alcohol having any effect.More than this and you were likedly to show some sign of inebriation. Even given that beer is reputed to have been weaker then than it is now, it is hard to believe that such large quantities of beer could be consumed without taking the toll on the drinker. Oh well....

One-Man Band:

Onesim:

Onesiphore:

Optatian:

Orc:

Oregano:

Organ Grinder:

Orion's Belt:

Orion:

Orlando:

Ormond:

Orodruin:

Orpheus:

Orson:

Oscar Nomination:

Oscar:

Osmund:

Ostian:

Ostrogoth:

Oswald:

Othello:

Other Man's Grass:

Othmar:

Otis:

Otto:

Ottoman:

Our National Poet:

Out-Herods Herod:

Outdoor Type:

Overlord:

Overnight Hero:

Ovid:

Owen:

Own Goal:

Ozymandias:

P

Pachelbel:

Pacian:

Paddington:

Paddy Paws:

Padre Padrone:

Paduin:

Palace Footman:

Palatine:

one of the seven hills on which the city of Roma was founded (see also: Aventine, Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Quirinal and Viminal).

Palladio:

Pamach:

Pambo:

Pamphil:

Pancras:

Pangloss:

Pantagath:

Pantagruel:

Pantagruel:

Pantaleon:

Pantechnicon:

Panurge:

Papal Bull:

Paphnut:

Papinian:

Pappageno:

Paramon:

Paranoid Android:

Pardulph:

Parmigianino:

Paschal:

Past-Master:

Past-Master:

Past-Master:

Paterfamilias:

Paterfamilias:

Paternian:

Patience Of Job:

Patriarch:

Patrick:

Patron Of The Arts:

Paul:

Pea-Shooter:

Peace Warrior:

Pearly King:

Peeping Tom:

Pegasus:

Pelagius:

People's Hero:

Percival:

Perdurate Steel:

Peregrine:

Pergentin:

Pergolese:

Periander:

Pericles:

Perkin Warbeck:

Perseus:

Pertinax:

Perugino:

Peter Pan:

Peter The Painter:

Peter:

Petit Ange:

Petronax:

Petronius:

Petruchio:

Pewter Tankard:

Phaeton:

Pharaoh's Curse:

Philaster:

Phileas Fogg:

Philemon:

Philibert:

Philip:

Philo:

Philogon:

Philoter:

Phineas Finn:

Phobos:

Phocas:

Phrabitas:

patriarch of Constantinople 488-489. What a name!

Pianissimo:

Pickwick:

Piers Plowman:

Piggy Porker:

Pilgrim Father:

Pilot Scheme:

Pinball Wizard:

Pinocchio:

Pipe-Smoker:

Pippin:

Pirate:

Pirmin:

Pius:

Plasticine Porter:

Plato:

Play It Again Sam:

Playboy Prince:

Playfellow:

Playing The Dane:

Plays By The Book:

Plechelm:

Plegmund:

Pliny The Elder:

Pliny The Elder:

Plumstead:

Plutarch:

Pluto:

Police Constable:

Pollux:

Polonius:

Polperro:

Polycarp:

Polychron:

Polydore:

Polyeuct:

Poncho:

Pontian:

Pontifex:

Pontius:

Poor Man's Wine:

Porcino:

Porphyry:

Porthos:

Powerhouse:

Prescennius:

Present Arms:

Pretextat:

Priam:

Prince Albert:

Prince Charming:

Prince Consort:

Prince Regent:

Princely Sum:

Princip:

Principe Azzurro:

Priscillian:

Priscus:

Probus:

Prochor:

Proculus:

Prodigal Son:

Production Unit:

Proliticus:

Prometheus:

Proper Gentleman:

Prosper:

Prospero:

Proteus:

Protogenes:

Prototypical:

Prove Me Wrong:

Psalmod:

Ptolemy:

Ptolemy:

Publius:

Pugsley:

Punctuation Mark:

Pupienus:

Purple Emperor:

Pygmalion:

Pyramus:

Pyrrhic Victory:

Pyrrhus:

Q

Quad Bike:

Quadragesim:

Quadrat:

Quaestor:

Quango:

Quango:

Quantum Mechanic:

Quasar:

Quasimodo:

Queequeg:

a major character in Melville's novel "Moby Dick". Native of an island in the South Pacific. An excellent harpoonist, he is also a cannibal.

Quentin:

Question Mark:

Qui Commando Io:

Quick Half:

Quick March:

Quiet Strength:

Quintian:

Quintilian:

Quintilis:

Quintillus:

Quintus:

Quiriac:

Quirinal:

one of the seven hills on which Roma was founded (see also: Aventine, Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine and Viminal).

Quite Dapper:

Quite Frankly:

Quixote:

Quizmaster:

Quorum:

Quotation Marks:

Qué Guapo:

R

Raconteur And Wit

Raconteur And Wit:

Raffish Roué:

Ragazzo Mio:

Ragged Robin:

Rainbow Warrior:

Raising Cain

Rake's Progress:

Ralph:

Ramrod:

Ramses:

Ramshackle:

Randolph:

Ranulph:

Raphael:

Ravel's Bolero:

Raw Recruit:

Raymond:

Rebel Rebel:

Rebel Rebel:

Red Admiral:

Red King:

Redford:

Redux:

Regency Dandy:

Regent:

Regimbald:

Reginald:

Regular Guy:

Reluctant Hero:

Reluctant Suitor:

Remacle:

Rembrandt:

Remus:

Renaissance Man:

René:

Repeat Offender:

Repentant Rogue:

Republican Guard:

Resistance Hero:

Return Of The King:

Reverential Tone:

Reverian:

Revolution:

Revolver:

Rex:

Latin for "king". A very common call name for dogs but I cannot recall a single dog whose pedigree name is Rex. Start a trend...

Reynard:

Rhetic:

Rhett Butler:

Ribert:

Riccio:

Rich Array:

Rich As Croesus:

Rich Benefactor:

Rich In Spirit:

the meaning is fairly obvious but I have included this name under "Male Names" because "Rich" is often used as a diminutive for "Richard" (like "Dick", "Richie" or "Dickie".

Rich Man Poor Man:

Rich Man's World:

Rich Reward:

Rich Vein:

Richard:

Riff-Raff:

Rigel:

Right-Hand Man:

Righteous Wrath:

Rightful King:

Rigobert:

Ringmaster:

Ringo:

Rip Van Winkle:

Roadhog:

Roan:

Robbing Peter:

Robert:

Robin Hood:

Robin:

Robinson Crusoe:

Robustian:

Roch:

St Roch is the patron saint of dogs. The name is pronounced "rock".

Rococo:

Roderick:

Rodney:

Rogatian:

Roger And Out:

Roger:

Roguish Smile:

Roister Doister:

Roland:

Rolling Stone:

Rollo:

Roman Emperor:

Roman Toga:

Roman:

Romanov:

Romaric:

Romaric:

Romeo:

Romuald:

Romulus:

Rory:

Rosamund:

Roundhead:

Rover's Return:

Roy:

male name, of Celtic origin, meaning "red", helped by the fact that it is the old spelling of the French word for "king", which nowadays is spelt "roi". Also my father's name. Another famous Roy was the much lamented Big O, Roy Orbison (who had several Number One hits in the 1960s.

Royal Emigré:

Royal Jester:

Royal Mail:

Royal Oak:

Rubens:

Rude Awakening:

Rudolph:

Rudyard:

Ruellin:

Rufin:

Rufus:

the call name of my first ever Sussex spaniel and to date only male Sussex. He appers in the logo at the top of the page. He was born on the 1st of February 1985 and his pedigree name was Topjoys Sussex Wanderer. He was a caterpillar on legs and very undershot but I loved him - still do. His colour was to die for, you don't get many Sussex that colour these days. He died of liver failure in October 1988 to my great shock.Also the nickname of King William II of England, son of and successor to William the Conqueror. The English adjective "rufous", meaning a brownish-red colour, comes from this word and supposedly refers to William's hair colour. There is a etymological connection between "red" and "rufous" (and also with "rust" and "russet". "Rufus" as a word meant "red/reddish" in Latin, though there are other words which translate as "red" (ruber, russus, puniceus et al).

Rugged Features:

Rugged Good Looks:

Rumble Of Thunder:

Rumbold:

Rumpelstiltskin:

Rumple Tweezer:

Runaway Train:

Runnymede:

Rupert:

Rustic:

apart from its adjectival use, there is also a St Rustic(us).

Rustle:

Rusty:

S

Sabin:

Sabinian:

Sabre Dance:

Sabre Reborn

Sabre:

Sadoth:

Roman Catholic saint of Persia. Lived in the 4th century.

Sagar:

Sage And Onion:

Sailor King:

Saki:

Sallustian:

Salvator:

Salvin:

Sam Gamgee:

Sam Wheat:

Samson:

Samuel:

Sanctin:

Sandrat:

Santa Baby:

Saracen:

Saruman:

Sasha:

Sasquatch:

Satchmo:

Saturn:

Saturnin:

Sauron:

Saxon:

Scatman:

Scherzo:

Italian for "joke", often used in a musical context. The word also means "I'm joking". Perfect for a dog with a happy disposition. Note also "Felix" which, although a name more often given to cats, is the Latin word for "happy".

School Captain:

Schoolboy Hero:

Schoolboy Howler:

Schoolgirl Crush:

Schoolmaster:

a synonym for a male teacher. Slightly dated these days, when everyone is a teacher.

Schwarzenegger:

Arnold of that name, Austrian-born bodybuilder, actor and American politician. Put bodybuilding on the map.

Seafarer:

Seasoned Warrior:

Seasoned Warrior:

Sebastian:

Secret Admirer:

Secundel:

Secundian:

Secundin:

Senoch:

Sentimental Guy:

Sentry Box:

Sentry Duty:

Sequan:

Seraphin:

Serapion:

Serge:

Serial Monogamy:

Serpentine:

Servan:

Servulus:

Set In A Major Key:

Seth:

Severian:

Severin:

Shadow Boxing:

Shadowfax:

Shakespearean:

Shaman:

Sheikh:

Shelley:

Percy Bysshe Shelley, English romantic poet. Read his "Ozymandias" if you never read anything else by him. It provides an excellent lesson to the overweeningly ambitious (politicians,businessmen, financiers, newspaper tycoons etc., as well as for kings and emperors).

Sherlock Holmes:

Sherlock:

Shiver My Timbers:

an exclamation of surprise or annoyance, nowadays associated solely with pirates. The meaning is "May my ship fall to pieces". "To shiver" has a secondary meaning of falling or being reduced to pieces", though it is quite literary. It is associated above all with Robert Louis Stevenson's nineteenth-century adventure classic, "Treasure Island", where the chief character, the pirate Long John Silver, uses it. The expression was probably popularised through the performance by the actor, Robert Newton, in the 1951 film dramatisation of "Treasure Island", a memorable if debatably over-the-top performance.

Show Of Strength:

Shylock:

Sicilian Brigand:

Sigfrid:

Sigismund:

Sigmund:

Silas Marner:

Silas:

Silverius:

Simeon:

Simon:

Simple Simon:

a nursery rhyme: "Simple Simon met a pieman going to the fair" For the rest of the rhyme, consult your favourite search engine. By the way be careful: "simple" originally meant and still means in certain instances "uncomplicated" or "easy". Unfortunately it also signifies "not very bright" or "a bit stupid", which is of course the meaning of the word in the nursery rhyme. In this day and age, it may seem to be a bit non-p.c. You have been warned.

Simplicissimus:

Simplicius:

Sir Barxalot:

Sir Clarence:

Sir Galahad:

Sir Jasper:

Sir Jocelyn:

Sir Montmorency:

Sir Mortimer:

Sir Percival:

Siric:

Sirius:

Sirocco:

Sissinius:

Six-Pack:

Sixt:

Skelton:

Skipper:

Skywalker:

Slalom:

Slartybartfast:

Sloop John B:

Small Deposit:

Small Latin:

the playwight, Ben Johnson, eulogised Shakespeare in his poem "To the memory of my beloved master William Shakespeare and what he hath left us", in which he describes the Bard as having: "small Latin and less Greek".

Smalltown Boy:

Smart Alec:

Smeagol:

Smokey Robinson:

Smooth Talker:

Snowman:

Sober As A Judge:

Soldier Blue:

Soldier Sailor:

Solitary Oak:

Solomon Grundy:

Solomon:

Somnus:

Son And Heir:

Son And Heir:

Son Of A Gun:

Son Of My Father:

Song Of Roland:

one of the greatest medieval epic poems and the first French chanson de geste to survive relatively intact.The author may be one Turoldus, but it is not clear from the context whether this is the case. It deals with a struggle between Christianity, as represented by the Emperor Charlemagne and the great warrior Roland and Islam as presesented by Marsile, the Saracen King of Spain. Not much subtlty of character as the Christians are mostly represented as wholly good while the Muslims are by and large evil and treacherous. It is inspired by the Battle of Roncesvalles which took place in the 8th century while the poem was written in the middle of the 12th century. The names of Roland and also of his best friend, Oliver, became popular as a result of this epic. The genre of epic deeds idealised in poetry is called "chanson de geste" (song of (epic) deeds) and is the first surviving literary work written in French. Another similar poetic extravaganza is the "Poem of the Cid", written in Spanish and again involving the medieval conflict between Christianity and Islam.

Sophocles:

Sophron:

Sophron:

Soter:

Soul Brother:

Sound And Fury:

Sovereign Lord:

Spearmint:

Spirit In The Sky:

Spitfire:

Sporting Hero:

Spotted Dick:

Spymaster:

Spyridon:

Squadron Leader:

Square-Bashing:

Stag Night:

Stanislas:

Starman:

Steerpike:

Stentorian Tones:

Stentorian Voice:

Stephen:

Sterling:

Stevedore:

Stig:

Stinking Rich:

Stockbroker Belt:

Stoic Resistance:

Strapping Youth:

Street Urchin:

Strider:

Strongman (Act):

Stuart:

Student Prince:

Stuff Of Heroes:

Stun-Gun:

Stunt Double:

Stuntman:

Sturdy And Steady:

Styx:

Suave Beau:

Suave Persuader:

Suburban Mr Jones:

Sugar Daddy:

Suited And Booted:

Suits You Sir:

Sulpic:

Sultan Of Swing:

Sultan Of Swing:

Sultan:

Summarise Proust:

Sun God:

Superhero:

Supreme Leader:

Surprise Package:

Swingeing Bill:

Swithin:

Sword And Sandal:

Sword Of Damocles:

Sydney:

Sylvan:

Sylvester:

Symmach:

Symphorian:

T

Tacitus:

Take No Prisoners:

Takes Tough Action:

Talacrian:

Talent Scout:

Talk Of The Devil:

Talking Big:

Tallinn:

Tancred:

Tanto Generoso:

Tarasius:

Tardis:

Tariq:

Tarquin:

Tartufo d'Alba:

Tarzan:

Tassos:

Taxi-Driver:

Tbilisi:

the capital of that mysterious and interesting Georgia of the Old World.

Tearaway:

Tears Of A Clown:

Teddy Boy:

Teenage Tearaway:

Telegram Sam:

Telemach:

Telesphore:

Ten-Bob Note:

Tenenan:

Terentian:

Terracotta Army:

Tertullian:

Tetley:

Thackeray:

Thaddeus:

Thalelaeus:

Thank You Ma'am:

That's My Boy:

The Aenid:

The Archbishop:

perhaps for a dog which has an ecclesiastical air.........

The Armchair Left:

The Ashes:

for cricket fans only, as the expression in itself can convey a negative connotation. It is a series of five test matches between the cricket treams of England and Australia over the attribution of a sort of urn reputedly containing the ashes of a cricket bail. It is too hideously boring to go into in detail, like the sport itself and unless you have the misfortune to be a cricket fan, I suggest you leave well alone and investigate no further. However if you are misguidedly an aficionado of one of the dullest sports ever contrived by the human brain, this might be a name you would wish to inflict on your dog, especially a blue (i.e. grey) dog. On the other hand, why you would after the dismal showing of England in the recent (2013-14) test match series, I could not begin to fathom, but it's a free world.

The Bard:

The Beast In Black:

The Beast Within:

The Black Prince:

The Boat Race:

The Boy In Blue:

The Boy Next Door:

The Caretaker:

The Custodian:

The Family Silver:

The Fifth Beatle:

The Front Line:

The Full Monty:

The Gloves Are Off:

The Go-To Guy:

The Good Seed:

The Great Gatsby:

The Hard Stuff:

The Hobbit:

The Hollow Crown:

The Iliad:

The Iliad:

The Iliad:

The Iron Duke:

The Jean Genie:

The King Of Swing:

The Lamplighter:

The Lap Of The Gods:

The Last Emperor:

The Last Tycoon:

The Lion's Share:

The Lionheart:

The Little Prince:

The Lost Domain:

the English translation of the great French novel, "Le Grand Meaulnes" but the French writer Alain-Fournier. He was killed in the first world war and although he began another novel, it remained incomplete at his death. This was the first French novel I ever read in French. It captivated me as a teenager and I recommend it now.

The Man Who Can:

The Marauder:

woudl suit perhaps a singularly boisterous puppy.

The Midas Touch:

The Mighty Quinn:

The Miller's Tale:

The Musketeer:

The Name's Bond:

The Name's Bond:

The Negus:

The Noble Art:

The Odyssey:

The Old Pretender:

The Patrician:

The Peacemaker:

The Pied Piper:

The Piper's Son:

The Poet:

The Pointed Sword:

The Showman:

The Sphinx:

The Tatler:

The Terminator:

The Thinker:

The Third Man:

The Walrus Of Love:

The War To End Wars:

The Wizard Of Oz:

The Woolsack:

Theocritus:

Theodard:

Theodemir:

Theoden:

Theodore:

Theodoric:

Theodosius:

Theodulph:

Theofrid:

Theolept:

Theophanes:

Theophil:

Theophylact:

Theotim:

Thesaurus:

This Gordon Isn't:

Thomas:

Thomian:

Thor:

Thorlac:

patron saint of Iceland

Thoth:

Thraseas:

Thunder Lizard:

might suit a hairless breed. "Thunder lizard" is the literal translation of the word "brontosaurus".

Thunder:

Thyrsus:

Tibald:

Tiber:

Tiberius:

Tibor:

Tibullus:

Tiepolo:

Tifoso:

Tigernach:

Tigides:

Tilbert:

Tillerman:

Time Lord:

Timon Of Athens:

Timon:

Timothy:

Tin Soldier:

Tinker Tailor:

Tinker's Cuss:

Tintagel:

Tintoretto:

Titan:

Titian:

Titus Andronicus:

Titus Ascot:

Titus Groan:

Titus:

To Go Boldly:

To Him Who Waits:

Tobias:

Toby:

Tolkien:

Tolpuddle Martyr:

Tolpuddle:

Tolstoy:

Tom Dick Or Harry:

Tomfoolery:

Tonio:

Tools Of The Trade:

Top Brass:

Top Gear:

Top Scorer:

Topolino:

Topping The Bill:

Tornado:

Torquato

Tossing The Caber:

Tossing The Caber:

Totem:

Tough As Old Boots:

Tough Love:

Toy Boy:

Trainspotter:

Trajan's Column:

Trajan:

Tranquillin:

Trebbiano:

Trebonian:

Treebeard:

Tribesman:

Tricky Dicky:

Triduna:

Tristan:

Triton:

Trond:

Trophim:

Troubador:

Troubadour:

Trouser Press:

Trudpert:

Trumpet Major:

Trumwin:

Trust In Princes:

Trusty Rusty:

Tryphon:

Tudor:

Tudwal:

Turbo:

Turbulent Priest:

Turku:

Turoldus:

Tweedle-Dee:

Tweedle-Dum:

Tweedledee:

Tweedledum:

Twinings:

Twist:

Twizzle:

Typhoo:

Tyranny Of Time:

Tyrone:

U

Udo:

Ufo:

Ukko:

the most powerful god in Pre-Christian Finnish mythology.

Ulfrid:

Ulric:

Ultan:

Ultimate Hero:

Ultimatum:

Ultravox:

Ulysses:

Umpire:

Underground Art:

Union Jack:

Universal Man:

Unknown Soldier:

Unlikely Ally:

Unobtrusive Hero:

Unrepentant Roué:

Unsung Hero:

Up In Arms:

Upanishad:

Uppercut:

Uppercut:

Uppermost:

Uranus:

Urban Bumpkin:

Urban Poet:

Urban Spaceman:

Urban Yokel:

Urban:

Urbit:

Urciscen

Uriah:

Uriel:

Urpasian:

Ursic:

Ursicin:

Ursin:

User's Manual:

Usthazanes:

Usurper:

Uthar Pendragon:

Uzbek:

V

Vagabond King:

Valdemar:

Valens:

Valentinian:

Valerian:

Valery:

Valhalla:

Valiant Knight:

Valorous Knight:

Vasari:

Velasquez:

Venator:

Venerable Bede:

Venerius:

the patron saint of lighthouse-keepers! I had intended to anglicise it to "Venery" but unfortunately, that word has certain connotations which I would not wish to give to a dog. If you are interested, please do the research yourself.

Venturin:

Venusian:

Veran:

Verecund:

Veremund:

Vermeer:

Veronese:

Verus:

Vespasian:

Viator:

Vic:

Vicelin:

German saint and bishop of Oldenburg in Holstein in the 12th century.

Victor Hugo:

Victor Ludorum:

Victor Ludorum:

Victor:

Victorian:

not just the adjective of anything pertaining to the reign of Queen Vistoria, but also the name of two saints: one North African who lived in the fifth century; the other Spanish who lived in the sixth century.

Victoric:

Victorin:

Viking Warrior:

Viking:

Village Squire:

Villic:

Vilnius:

capital of Lithuania

Vim And Vigour:

Viminal:

one of the seven hills on which Rome was founded (see also: Aventine, Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine and Quirinal).

Vincent:

Vindician:

Violin Virtuoso:

Virgil:

Virgil:

Vishnu:

Vitalian:

Vitalic:

Vitalis:

Vitantonio:

Vitellius:

Vitruvian Man:

Vitus:

Vivaldi:

Vivat Rex:

Vivian:

Vladimir:

Volcano:

Voltaire:

Volusian:

Roman emperor (252-253).

Vorpal Blade:

Vortex:

Vulcan:

Vulgan:

Vulgis:

Vulpian:

Catholic saint born in Syria and martyred in the fourth century. The name derives from the Latin word for "fox" so it would suit a dog that resembles or whose coat is like that of a fox.

W

Waiting For Godot:

Waldalen:

Waldebert:

Walstan:

Walter:

Wanderer:

Wandering Hans:

Wanton Vandalism:

War Of Attrition:

War Zone:

Warlock:

Warlord:

Warm Reception:

Warrior King:

Warrior Prince:

Warrior Princess:

Wasim:

Watergate:

Waterloo:

Waverley:

novel by Walter Scott. Can anyone read Scott these days? I read "Rob Roy" and found it totally indigestible, from the attempt to imitate Scottish speech to the uninteresting plot line.

Way Over Yonder:

Weathercock:

Wee Willie Winkie:

Weekend Warrior:

Welcome The Hero:

Wellington (Boot):

Wellington:

Welsh Wizard:

Welsh Wizard:

Wendolin:

What The Dickens:

Wheatsheaf:

Whimsical Walter:

Whirling Dervish:

White Admiral:

White King:

White Knight:

Whizz Kid:

Who's A Pretty Boy:

Wide Of The Mark:

Widrad:

Wields The Sword:

Wigbert:

Wilberforce:

Wilberforce:

Wilfrid:

Will O'The Wisp:

Will Scarlett:

Will To Please:

Will To Succeed:

Will To Survive::

Will To Win:

Will of Iron:

Will of The People:

Willehad:

William:

the name of four kings of England (the fifth is in the offing); three kings of the Netherlands (the current Dutch king is named Willem Alexander) and four grand dukes of Luxembourg (whose crown prince is also called William - that is, "Guillaume" in French).

Willibrord:

patron saint of Luxembourg!

Willow:

Willy-Nilly:

Winaman:

Windsor:

Winewald:

Winoc:

Winston Smith:

Winston:

Winwaloc:

Wiomad:

Wiseacre:

Witch Doctor:

Wizard Of Oz:

Wizard's Potion:

Wizardry:

Woden:

Wolf Whistle:

Wolfgang Amadeus:

Wolfgang:

Woodcock:

Wordsmith:

Wordsmith:

Wordsworth:

Wordsworth:

Wordsworth:

World Cup Final:

Would-Be Hero:

Wrangler:

Wulfram:

Wulfran:

Wulfric:

Wulfstan:

Wulfstan:

Wulmar:

Wulsin:

Wystan:

Wyvern:

X

Xander:

Xemx:

Maltese for "sun". Suitable for a male dog.

Xemxi:

Maltese for "sunny" but this is the masculine for so is suitable only for a male dog. See also "Xemx" and "Xemxiya".

Xenos:

Greek for "foreigner". Often considered a term of abuse in some languages, I consider a foreigner interesting and someone generally to be welcomed. But I am an unashamed "xenophile", having been a foreigner all my life, even in England. My Broholmer's pet name is "Xenos".

Xerxes:

Xiphilin:

Xul:

the Mayan dog god. Would particularly suit any South American breed (Mexican hairless, Peruvian hairless, et al.).

Y

Yachtsman:

Yahoo:

Yahto:

Yann:

Yannick:

Yardan:

Yardarm:

Yardbird:

Yardstick:

Yeats:

Yeoman:

Yes-Man:

Yggdrasil:

Ymar:

Yo-Ho-Ho:

Yogi:

York:

Young Buck:

Young Delinquent:

Young Dude:

Young Fogey:

Young Hoodlum:

Young Tearaway:

Young Trendy:

Youngblood:

Younger Brother:

Your Local Yokel:

Your Teddy Bear:

Yrchard:

Yrieix:

Ysarn:

Yuri:

Ywi:

Z

Zadig:

Armenian for "Easter".Also the name of my favourite Voltaire short story about fate and destiny ("Mais..." the most imortant dots in literature). Read it and see.

Zadig:

Armenian for "Easter".Also the name of my favourite Voltaire short story about fate and destiny ("Mais..." the most imortant dots in literature). Read it and see.

Zadig:

Armenian for "Easter".Also the name of my favourite Voltaire short story about fate and destiny ("Mais..." the most important dots in literature). Read it and see.

Zadkiel:

Zaire:

Zarathustra:

Zarathustra:

Zarzant:

Armenian boy's name.

Zbigniew:

Zebin:

Zennor:

Zeno:

Zenoby:

Zephyr:

Zephyrin:

Zeppelin:

Zeppelin:

Zeppelin:

Zero To Hero:

Zeus:

Zhivago:

Ziggy Stardust:

Zigzag:

Zimbabwe:

Zodiac

Zodiac:

Zog:

Zola:

Zoltan:

Zoravan:

Armenian for "powerful".

Zorba The Greek:

Zorba:

Zorro:

Zotic:

Zulu Warrior:

Zulu:

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